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The Misuse of the American Constitution December 6, 2006

Posted by harmon in Articles.
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The British Parliament was anything but content over the signing of the American Constitution in 1787. It made official, among many things, the independent right for America to stand on its own as a free nation—under God. No longer would there be taxation without representation. No longer would the American people have to suffer under unjustified rule from the old world. The signing of the Constitution set apart America from any other nation in existence, establishing her as a just and goodly realm that would not be wavered by enemy force, and that would stand firm under the eternal leadership of God the father.

Indeed when the Constitutional Convention gathered in Philadelphia on that summers day to construct a new, moral way of life, an empire built under God was the primary initiative. They understood the significance in the faith of Christianity, as every man there either believed in and worshiped, or respected those who believed in and worshiped, the supreme creator and father of all living. George Washington, signer of the Constitution and one of the greatest, most respected presidents in the history of the United States, noted in his Fairwell Address that, quote: “Morality is a necessary spring of popular government. Let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion.” “…reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.” The whole reason why America was founded in the first place was because a handful of English misfits wanted a nation where they could worship God as they pleased without satanic interference. From the very beginning America was meant to be a kingdom for God and his followers.

But the fathers of the Constitution knew that there would be a time in the future when certain adjustments would have to be made, so they designed the Constitution to be flexible. Even Hamilton pointed out, upon argument over a national bank being accepted in America, that all the powers of the national government could not be set down in explicit words, for, quote: “that would mean intolerable detail.” However arguing over a national bank is one thing, but arguing over abortion, same-sex marriage, letting a Vampire be governor of Minnesota…. These are dissimilar affairs entirely. The forefathers never dreamed that their Constitution would ever be the object of such controversy.

There is a segment in the Constitution, called the Bill of Rights, that allows Americans the freedom of speech. This section ensures the flexibility of the Constitution, and was written in light of granting Americans the legitimate power to stand up against opposing crowds, and to have the right to participate in religion. The freedom of speech is in many respects a good thing; it separates America from the common dictatorship. But when representatives rise up in force, wishing to misuse or disuse the powers granted us a free nation under father God, suddenly Hamilton’s statement becomes dire.

Open up a family-friendly magazine and find repetitive segments of profanity. Turn on the Television and prepare to gaze upon some man’s or woman’s naked body. Sit back long enough and you’ll witness the destruction of biblical monuments, such as the ten commandments, the one set of laws that every nation should follow.

Some representatives say that as time advances and changes, the Constitution should advance and change. They claim that Congress of the late eighteenth century could not look into the future and foresee what changes and difficulties lay ahead, so their judgment in many areas was clouded.

It is true that time does advance, and congress could not look into the future. But has it never occurred to these representatives that, because congress of the time did not foresee the American future as a future of greed, abuse, lust, the Constitution therefore holds no outright amendments binding such? Never in their wildest dreams could they imagine future American citizens, who shall forever build their stronghold upon God, fighting to discontinue the worship of God! Indeed that thought alone should awaken sleepy politics of the nation, and bring to life a controversy of its own.

And what do we as true American citizens do to legally fill in the gaps intentionally (for sake of flexibility) scattered throughout the Constitution? How do we know when the freedom of speech is taken too far, when the concerns of American citizens, according to the one God upon which this nation was founded, become concerns of greed, lust, abuse?

In the past century mankind has speculated seriously over the equation of right and wrong. One party may find favor in a rainy day, the other in a sunny, bright day. Over here we have the democratic group, over there the republican. How do we know who is the true god, my god or your god? Is it wrong to consider the universe infinite?

The fact is that we men, born into our sins, naturally face these decisions. And if we men were to decide right now to form another nation, with our own regulations and rights, how might we word our own Constitution?

Reading a book, you see not only the word use, but the author his self. You realize that he is just another human being, bearing the human language. And if he messes up on a word or phrase, you the reader obliges to overlook, knowing what he really meant because you are familiar with his spirit.

Picture the fathers of the Constitution as the authors of a very important, very precise book called the Bill of Rights. They sat down to present what was on their hearts, in the most natural way they knew how.

Indeed, if you and a group of people sat to make your own Constitution today, how would you word what is on your heart? And what would you do if, over two centuries later, representatives gathered in dispute over your words, saying that because you left a space here, or used the word “flexible”, they can squeeze in and tear apart any form of morality you had established, “filling in the spaces” with anything they please to better suit their greedy desires?

America was founded with a heart. All true Christians, true leaders in the Lord, bear this heart. And it is with this heart that appropriate decisions are made.

I’m sure, if you are a true American, you care about the well being of this country, and pray that it lasts. Indeed what separates America from any other nation on earth? Religion. Christian religion, that is. Most of us are born into some sort of Christian environment. It is bred into our blood. We grow up, knowing of morality, knowing what is right and wrong. We are a different people, sitting apart from any other class of people on earth. And it’s all because of our beliefs. We can not allow false idols and false religion to become a standing part of our country. It will change our perspectives of morality, and it will change who we are. Like I said in the article, America was founded with a heart. The heart of America is who America is. What America is! To change any aspect of our own morality is to alter the foundations upon which this nation dwells. American citizens need to rise up against the plague that is creeping into our good nation. Stop defiling our constitution!

   C.S.H.  2006

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Comments»

1. Uncooke - June 25, 2007
2. Dean Goodale Jr - March 14, 2010

It has been my thought that the most difficult thing the Founding Fathers had to do in wording The Constitution was making sure that we truly had freedom of religion. That we, by law, could not and should not kill anyone for there religious belief. That freedom to believe as one chooses be of utmost importance and that we as a nation live together honoring that.


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